Hazardous Materials Management Services Compendium of Private Sector and Municipal Clients

Posted on July 31, 2015

Client: Hazardous Materials Management Services
Project Type: Compendium of Private Sector and Municipal Clients

Project Description

IntroductionHazMat workers bagging material

Dvirka and Bartilucci Consulting Engineers (D&B) has provided engineering/technical services to a broad spectrum of both large and small, public and private sector clients in support of Hazardous Materials Management programs. Assignments have included inspection, sampling, abatement design and project monitoring for numerous renovation, alteration, demolition and Brownfield projects. Market sectors include large municipal clients such as the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and New York City Water Board; State entities such as the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and County Governments, including Nassau County, Orange County and Westchester County. Lastly, we have provided these services to a number of confidential private clients, as well as a host of smaller municipal entities.

Overall, assignments generally include one or more of the following technical activities carried out by our properly trained certified/licensed staff:

• Hazardous Materials Assessments
— asbestos-containing material
— lead-based paint
— PCBs
— mercury
• Visual Inspection and Sampling
• Design of Abatement Programs
— contract documents
— plans
— specifications
• Preparation of alternative work practice applications
• Oversight of Abatement
• Independent Air Sampling and Monitoring
• Universal Waste Management
• Development/Implementation Operation and Maintenance Plans

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New York City Department of Environmental Protection

Phase I/Phase II Site Assessments of 17 Water Supply Stations throughout New York

Water storage tank towerD&B was responsible for conducting separate and independent Phase I follow-up and Phase II Environmental Site Assessments (ESAs) of 17 water supply stations (collectively known as Site Group 2) located throughout Queens, New York, that were acquired by the New York City Water Board (NYCWB) from the Jamaica Water Supply Company. The assessments included surface and subsurface soil sampling, lead-based paint investigations, asbestos surveys, mercury vapor and sediment investigations, and groundwater monitoring.

A critical component of the project was the extremely aggressive schedule and project milestones associated with the project. This aggressive schedule was driven by the fact that the City had a fixed contractual timeline to prepare and file any claims for environmental contamination identified at these recently acquired sites. All work, including the preparation of generic as well as  site specific Work Plans and Health and Safety Plans, field work, analytical data compilation and interpretation, preparation  of remedial/ abatement cost estimates and report preparation was required to be completed for all 17 sites within approximately 6 weeks from the date of contract execution. These scheduling concerns were, in fact, so critical to the successful completion of the project that contractual provisions for liquidated damages were initially set at $17,000 for every day that a project milestone was missed. Taking into account the five project milestones, this could have translated into $85,000 in  damages for every day the project was behind schedule. It is worthy to note that the firm met all of the project milestones (some ahead of schedule) and successfully completed all aspects of the project, which, based on the findings of our investigations, allowed the City to file claims for environmental contamination totaling up to $2,200,000.

The following discussion presents a summary of the activities undertaken in support of the Phase II ESA Program, along with an overview of the findings and conclusions by media investigated.

Surface Soil Sampling ProgramWater storage tank

Surface soil sampling was undertaken at 9 of the 17 sites comprising Site Group 2 (i.e., at those sites containing water storage tanks). The analytical results of the surface soil samples indicated that elevated levels of chromium, lead and zinc were present in the soil surrounding the majority of the water supply tanks. Therefore, remediation of the soil surrounding these tanks was recommended. The total cost to implement these remedial activities was estimated to be approximately $585,000.

Soil Boring Program

Soil borings were installed at 8 of the 17 sites comprising Site Group 2. The analytical results associated with the soil boring program indicated that elevated levels of semivolatile organic compounds and metals were present within and/or adjacent to various areas of environmental concern (i.e., underground storage tanks, dry wells, areas of stressed/stained vegetation, etc.). Therefore, remediation of the soil in the vicinity of these areas was recommended. The total cost to implement these remedial activities was estimated to be approximately $270,000.

Lead-Based Paint Investigationwater supply station

All 17 of the sites comprising Site Group 2 were evaluated for the presence of lead-based paint. Lead-based paint was identified as being present throughout the 17 sites comprising Site Group 2. It was noted that lead-based painted surfaces could be addressed on a project-specific basis to provide short-term protection to on-site personnel/contractors who would be working on machinery/equipment with lead-based painted surfaces. However, addressing lead-based painted surfaces in this manner requires the implementation of an operation and maintenance (O&M) program to provide for notifications to on-site personnel/contractors, training, personal exposure monitoring and inspection programs. However, these types of O&M procedures, and the typical short-term interim nature of addressing lead-based painted surfaces in this manner, was not expected to be practical for water supply stations where numerous “non-resident” personnel and contractors could be expected to be working on-site at any given time. As a result, it was recommended that the facilities be rendered “Lead Free” (i.e., providing for the removal of all lead-based paint). The total cost to implement these abatement activities was estimated to be approximately $925,000.

Mercury Investigationroom inside pump house

Due to the historical use of mercury-containing Venturi flow meters in each of the 17 water supply stations, all 17 of the sites comprising Site Group 2 were evaluated for the presence of mercury vapor and mercury contaminated soil/sediment. The field investigation was designed to minimize the requirements for analytical sampling through the use of Jerome mercury vapor analyzers. Various sumps, pits, drains, utility trenches and other potential contaminant pathways and/or receptors were evaluated throughout the well houses and pump houses present at each of the 17 water supply stations.

Asbestos Investigation

All 17 of the sites comprising Site Group 2 were evaluated for the presence of asbestos-containing material (ACM). ACM was identified as being present throughout the 17 sites comprising Site Group 2. It was noted that the material could remain in place if left undisturbed and certain operation and maintenance (O&M) requirements were adhered to in accordance with OSHA standards. However, since it was not expected to be practical to implement an O&M program at each of the 17 water supply stations comprising Site Group 2, abatement of the ACM was recommended. The total cost to implement these abatement activities was estimated to be approximately $225,000.

Groundwater Monitoring Well Program

Two groundwater monitoring wells (one upgradient and one downgradient) were installed at 7 of the 17 sites comprising Site Group 2. Based upon the analytical results obtained from the groundwater samples collected from these wells, remediation of groundwater was not warranted at these sites with regard to the findings of the Phase II ESA.

NYCDEP Contract DEL 148 (performed under CRO 288)

Removal and Replacement of Mercury-Contaminated Valve Actuators at Shaft 10 DA

Shaft 10 of the Delaware Aqueduct is a mechanical control facility that serves to regulate the amount of water released from the West Branch Reservoir into that portion of the Delaware Aqueduct between the West Branch Reservoir and the Kensico  Reservoir located in Westchester County. Original valve control equipment (actuators) installed in the facility used elemental mercury as a seal to contain cooling and lubrication oil within the valve actuator. There are a total of 14 valve actuators included under the work of DEL 148 that contain a mercury seal.

Dvirka and Bartilucci Consulting Engineers (D&B) was retained by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) to undertake the following activities in support of this assignment:

• Development and implementation of a Health and Safety Plan (HASP);
• Performance of pre- and post-sampling and testing to monitor both removal and cleanup work in accordance with the HASP;
• Removal of 14 valve actuators that are known to contain elemental mercury seals;
• Installation of 14 replacement valve actuators, controllers, a remote operating center for valve operation and installation of associated equipment;
• Removal and replacement of electrical conduit, lighting fixtures and cable providing power, lighting and signals for the new valve actuators and control equipment; and
• Furnishing of electrical and mechanical maintenance and testing equipment.

The D&B Team provided full CM services and oversight of the DEL 148 Contract. Administrative responsibilities include, but
are not limited to:

• Establishing lines of communication and coordination;
• Conducting progress and special meetings;
• Receiving input from the designer—in this case, the NYCDEP;
• Coordination with inter-departmental bureaus and divisions including BWS-TOS, BWS-Water Quality and BWS-Regulatory Compliance;
• Issuing monthly progress reports and schedule analysis; and
• Issuing of annual reports, project information documents, preliminary delay analysis reports and annual Contractor evaluations.

Resident engineering responsibilities included:Map illustrating NYC's water supply system

• Inspect all work for compliance with the Contract Documents.
• Verify quantities and prepare payment estimates.
• Maintain and provide project-related records, information and forms.
• Maintain logs of hazardous waste inventory and shipping/disposal manifests.
• Initiate and process change orders, maintain time and material records and negotiate change orders with the Project Contractor.
• Coordinate Contractor’s operations with operations required to be performed by the NYCDEP-BWS.
• Coordinate and administer startup of new equipment and systems with representative of NYCDEP-BEE and BWS as required.

In accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), spent elemental mercury is a hazardous waste if it exceeds toxicity characteristic of 0.2 mg/l under the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). In accordance with an EPA Administrative Order on Consent dated September 2000, the City was required to remove the existing 14 mercury-containing valve actuators and to replace them with new actuators. This work was performed under Contract DEL 148.

The major work of Contract DEL 148 required removal and replacement of mercury-contaminated valve actuators on ten 48” increment gate valves, two 60” x 54” rectangular valves and two 12” vacuum breaker valves. During removal of each existing actuator assembly, hazardous waste handling procedures and protocols were implemented and strictly enforced to ensure that all process fluids were properly captured, contained and prepared for disposal. In addition, samples of all fluids and solids were collected and analyzed for proper waste characterization.

NYCDEP Contract DEL 157 (performed under CRO 288)

Removal and Replacement of Mercury-Contaminated Equipment and the Modernization of Flow Metering Facilities in the Upstate Water Supply

Dvirka and Bartilucci Consulting Engineers (D&B) was “tapped” by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection to provide engineering/technical support with regard to upgrading facilities related to the Delaware Water Supply System. The scope of work consisted of removing the existing flow metering equipment and pressure piping containing mercury with the modernization of flow monitoring equipment throughout the Delaware Water Supply System.

The flow and pressure metering instrumentation originally installed in these facilities contained elemental mercury. There are a total of 17 project sites, located both east and west of the Hudson River, included in this contract that contain elemental mercury within the instrumentation or stored in adjacent vessels.

The major work of this contract provides for:

• Development and implementation of a Health and Safety Plan (HASP);
• Performance of pre-and post-sampling and testing to monitor both removal and cleanup work in accordance with the HASP;
• Removal of 66 devices that are known to contain elemental mercury;
• Development and implementation of a procedure for cleaning and sampling mercury-contaminated Venturi meter pressure rings at the various work locations;
• Removal of stored mercury;
• Delivery and assembly of an Instrumentation Calibration Office and equipment;
• Installation of replacement instrumentation, piping and ancillary equipment.
• Removal and replacement of electrical conduit, lighting fixtures and cable providing power, lighting and signals for the new equipment; and
• Furnishing of electrical and mechanical maintenance and testing equipment.

Administrative responsibilities included:

• Establishing lines of communication and coordination;
• Conducting progress and special meetings;
• Receiving input from the designer—in this case, the NYCDEP;
• Coordination with inter-departmental bureaus and divisions, including BWS-TOS, BWS-Water Quality and BWS-Regulatory Compliance;
• Issue monthly progress reports and schedule analysis; and
• Issuing of annual reports, project information documents, preliminary delay analysis reports and annual contractor evaluations.

Resident engineering responsibilities included:

• Inspect all work for compliance with the Contract Documents.
• Verify quantities and prepare payment estimates.
• Maintain and provide project-related records, information and forms.
• Maintain logs of hazardous waste inventory and shipping/disposal manifests. • Initiate and process change orders, maintain time and material records and negotiate change orders with the Project Contractor.
• Coordinate Contractor’s operations with operations required to be performed by the NYCDEP-BWS.
• Coordinate and administer startup of new equipment and systems with representative of NYCDEP-BEE and BWS as required.

In accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), spent elemental mercury is a hazardous waste if it  exceeds the toxicity characteristic of 0.2 mg/l under the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). In accordance with an EPA Administrative Order on Consent dated September 2000, the City was required to remove the existing mercury-containing instrumentation and the stored mercury and to replace them with updated non mercury containing devices.

The major work of Contract DEL-157 required the removal of 66 mercury-containing manometers, pressure transducers and instrument piping used to monitor flow through various facilities in the Delaware Water Supply System. During removal of each existing device, hazardous waste management and handling procedures and protocols were implemented and strictly enforced to ensure that all process fluids were properly captured, contained and prepared for disposal. In addition, samples of all fluids and solids were collected and analyzed for proper waste characterization.

NYCDEP Contract DEL 157 (performed under CRO 288)

Removal and Replacement of Mercury-Contaminated Equipment and the Modernization of Flow Metering Facilities in the Upstate Water Supply

Dvirka and Bartilucci Consulting Engineers (D&B) was retained by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) as the prime consultant to rehabilitate four pumping stations in Bronx County that manage storm water drainage from adjacent roadways. Prior to initiating design of the rehabilitation program, D&B completed a hazardous materials assessment of each of the four pumping stations with emphasis placed on identifying “Legacy” constituents of concern including lead jacketed cables and pipes, lead-based paint, asbestos containing materials (ACM), mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

The 233rd Street Pumping Station and the Metcalf Avenue Pumping Station serve the northern and southern ends of the Bronx River Parkway and consist of a small superstructure constructed circa 1932 and 1945, respectively. Both of these pumping stations require engineering design services related to mechanical, electrical, and heating/ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system upgrades. The White Plains Road Pumping Station and the Jerome Avenue Pumping Station are sub-grade stations serving the Cross Bronx Expressway. Both of these pumping stations required mechanical upgrades, relocation of  electrical controls above grade, improved access for pump removal, and ventilation provisions. As part of the engineering design, D&B’s role was to evaluate the appropriateness of various technologies for the City’s consideration and prepare contract documents for the recommended upgrades.

Given their ages, lead, ACM, mercury and PCBs are frequently found within structural components and mechanical systems of the City’s pumping stations. Lead components can include electrical wiring insulation, water pipes, and painted surfaces. ACM can include pipe insulation, fireproofing, flooring, roofing and siding materials, waterproofing compounds, vibration dampeners, gaskets, and caulking among other building materials. Mercury containing equipment can include electrical switches, sensors, gauges and meters such as those used to operate the float devices at the pumping stations. PCB components can include painted surfaces, caulking and other building materials. Therefore, it was necessary to identify these hazardous materials to determine the appropriate handling and disposal methods prior to rehabilitation activities.

Hazardous Materials (“Legacy”) Assessment

D&B conducted the hazardous materials assessment of the four pumping stations that included:

• A visual assessment for lead jacketed cables and lead jointed pipes. This entailed an interior inspection of accessible electrical cabinets and exposed water pipes. • X-ray fluorescence (XRF) testing for lead-based paint (LBP) using an LPA-1 Analyzer, which provides digital readings, as well as a visual assessment of the colors and conditions of the painted surfaces by a USEPA certified Lead-based Paint Inspector.
• Bulk sampling for asbestos containing materials (ACM) in conjunction with a visual assessment identifying the types, quantities, and conditions of the ACM by a licensed NYSDOL and NYCDEP Asbestos Investigator. The samples were analyzed by a contract laboratory using Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) and/or Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) depending on whether the material was identified as friable or non-friable.
• Wipe sampling for mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) adjacent to various pieces of mechanical equipment and stained areas of the floors. The samples were analyzed by a contract laboratory using USEPA methods SW- 846/7471 and SW-846/8082. The floor area wiped was also measured during sample collection so that concentrations could be expressed as ug/cm2.
• Preparing sketches and photographing locations and materials sampled.NYCDEP pumping station building

Key Findings

Key findings of the hazardous materials assessment included the following:

• Various painted surfaces within each of the four pumping stations were identified as lead based paint based at concentrations above the USEPA and NYCDEP action level of 1.0 mg/cm2.
• Lead jacketed cable was identified within the electric panel in the Metcalf Avenue Pumping Station and confirmed with XRF testing as having a lead concentration of 5.8 mg/cm2.
• Lead jointed pipes were not identified within the four pumping stations.
• Various building materials within each of the four pumping stations were positively classified as ACM based on the USEPA  NESHAP criteria of greater than 1 percent asbestos fibers in a sample of homogenous material.Workers outside at the pump station area
• PCB concentrations were detected in wipe samples collected from the Metcalf Avenue Pumping Station. A risk assessment of the PCB concentrations that were detected indicated that they were well below the USEPA risk based criteria.
• Mercury was not detected in any of the wipe samples collected from the four pumping stations. Mercury containing float switches were visually identified within the White Plains Road Pumping Station and the Metcalf Avenue Pumping Station.

The findings of the hazardous materials were utilized to identify the components of each pumping station requiring abatement activities prior to dismantling/demolition. The hazardous materials assessment was completed on schedule and within budget. 

Metropolitan Transportation Authority – Long Island Rail Road

MTA_Logo

Site Assessments of 20 Electric Substations for Mercury Contamination

The Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) entered into three Voluntary Cleanup Agreements (VCAs) with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) to perform investigations and remedial actions at 20 LIRR electric substations found to contain mercury, PCB, asbestos and semivolatile organic compounds contamination. The LIRR retained the services of Dvirka and Bartilucci Consulting Engineers (D&B) to perform this work.

BackgroundL.I.R.R Substation building number 6A

The LIRR constructed, operated and maintained substations from the early 1930’s through 1951 that utilized mercury rectifiers. These rectifiers allowed the LIRR to receive 60-cycle, alternating current (AC) from local utilities and convert it to direct current (DC) for use as a source of electric power for its locomotives and electric passenger car fleet. It is believed that during the early 1980’s, the remaining mercury rectifiers were taken out of service and physically removed from these LIRR substations and replaced with nonmercury-containing solid state equipment. However, due to uncertainties surrounding the work practices that may have been employed when managing the operation and maintenance of these mercury rectifiers, the LIRR believed it was necessary to conduct environmental assessments to determine the potential effects that may have occurred to the surrounding environment.

The 20 substations are located throughout Suffolk (2 sites), Nassau (13 sites) and Queens Counties (5 sites) on Long Island, New York. As part of that program, D&B identified mercury contaminated soil at all 20 substations. Due to impending LIRR substation requirements associated with the upgrading of the rail system to accommodate the new fleet of M7 train cars, additional investigation and remediation of these three substations was given priority over the remaining 17 substations that were initially investigated.

Scope of Work

The primary objective of the site investigations was to further delineate the extent of impacted soil within areas where mercury had previously been identified during the initial Site Assessment of the 20 substations conducted in 1999. The Scope of Work associated with this project was conducted simultaneously with two other environmental projects which D&B was undertaking at the substations, namely an Underground Injection Control (UIC) Closure program and Construction Excavation Sampling and oversight. As a result, continuous cooperation between the LIRR’s System Safety, Substations, Flagging and Capital Departments, as well as the Nassau County Department of Health, NYSDEC, subcontractors, and local residents and business owners was paramount. The ongoing field investigation of the 20 substations included:

• collection of approximately 1,000 surface soil samples for chemical analysis;
• collection of approximately 2,000 subsurface soil samples for chemical analysis;
• advancing of approximately 1,200 soil probes both outside and inside the substations structures;
• installation and sampling of an 86-foot monitoring well at the Manhasset Substation;
• advancement and sampling of 56 groundwater probes;
• collection of four sediment samples within Manhasset Bay;
• continuous air monitoring of the breathing zone for mercury during sampling activities; and
• Fish and Wildlife Resources Impact Analysis at eight of the Substations.

Human Health Exposure Assessment

As part of the investigation, D&B has completed an exposure assessment at each Substation to determine how and when an individual might be exposed to contaminants of potential concern under existing and future site conditions.

The objectives of the Human Health Exposure Assessment for the three substations include:

• provide a determination of potential risk under current/ baseline site conditions, including identification of contaminant migration pathways and potential receptors;
• provide a basis for determining contaminant levels that provide adequate protection of human health and the environment;
• assess exposure pathways associated with surface soil, subsurface soil, groundwater and air; and
• identify the need for corrective measures.

Remedial Action Work Plan

Based on the results of the investigation described above, D&B completed a Remedial Action Work Plan (RAWP) that evaluated several remedial alternatives to eliminate or mitigate identified potential exposure pathways. A remedial alternative was selected based on this evaluation and the RAWP included a detailed description of the selected remedial alternative.

Upon approval of the RAWP by the NYSDEC, D&B proceeded with the full scale design of the selected remedial alternative for each substation.

As of the summer of 2010, D&B has completed remedial activities at 6 of the 20 substations.

Underground Injection Control (UIC) Closure Program

As discussed above, D&B conducted a UIC closure program at the three substations. This program consisted of the following activities:Vac Truck next to substation building

• drainage/discharge determination to identify the discharge points of various floor drains,
slop sinks and pits inside and outside of the substations;
• subsurface soil sampling to depths ranging up to 20 feet bgs at 13 structures;
• engineering oversight of soil excavation from the bottom of 13 UIC structures, including the demolition and removal of a 10 foot deep dry well within saturated soil in Island Park and excavations in level C (respirator) protective equipment beneath concrete pits inside the Manhasset Substation;
• post-excavation endpoint sampling to confirm successful remediation; and
• engineering oversight of backfilling and concrete capping of injection well.

Construction Excavation Sampling Programroom

As discussed above, the LIRR is in the process of performing substation upgrades at each of the three substations in order to enable their new fleet of M7 train cars. These upgrades called for the complete removal of transformer equipment and installation of new transformer equipment at all three substations. In addition, the LIRR had plans for erecting an entirely new substation adjacent to the existing Island Park Substation. Prior to demolition and construction, D&B conducted subsurface soil sampling to identify any site-related impacts within areas that had been planned for excavation.

As part of the Construction Excavation Sampling Program, D&B advanced a total of 31 soil probes at the three substation sites to depths of up to 20 feet below grade. Sample analysis included Target Analyte List (TAL) metals, Semivolatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The results of this sampling program indicated isolated areas where these constituents were found to be in excess of the NYSDEC Technical and Administrative Guidance Memorandum (TAGM) 4046 Recommended Cleanup Objectives. However, these constituents were not detected at levels which would invariably pose a threat to the health of on-site construction personnel or LIRR employees.

Construction Excavation Engineering OversightBobcat machine lifting soil

Subsequent to the Construction Excavation Sampling Program, the LIRR utilized an environmental remediation contractor to complete the excavations of all areas necessary to support the substation upgrades. In association with this effort, D&B provided engineering oversight to ensure that all appropriate areas were excavated to the required depths. In addition, D&B implemented a health and safety plan, which included community air monitoring, to ensure the safety of all on-site personnel. Throughout this project, D&B acted as a liaison between the LIRR and their remedial contractor, often coordinating various logistics associated with a successful outcome. These included:

• daily and weekly scheduling of remediation to allow the LIRR as much commuter parking as practical (Island Park Substation);
• enforcement of work plan requirements to prevent LIRR nuisances to local residences (Manhasset and Island Park); and
• assistance in daily coordination between LIRR System Safety Department’s remedial contractor and LIRR Capital Department’s civil contractor (Island Park).

Orange County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation

OrangeCounty_Logo

Glenmere Lake Property Site Investigation/Remedial Alternatives Evaluation and Interim Remedial Measure

Dvirka and Bartilucci Consulting Engineers (D&B) was retained by the Orange County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation (the County) to perform a Site Investigation, Remedial Alternatives Analysis and Interim Remedial Measure at the Glenmere Lake Property, located in the Town of Chester, Orange County, New York. The project was funded by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) Environmental Restoration Program.

The Glenmere Lake Property consists of a 10-acre parcel of land that includes a mixture of woodland and overgrown fields with four dilapidated buildings located in the western most portion of the property. In addition, a concrete and stone structure is located on the easternmost portion of the property. Lastly, three underground storage tanks (USTs) and two above ground storage (ASTs) were located on the property. The property is located on the northernmost shoreline of Glenmere Lake which serves as the nearby Village of Florida’s drinking water supply.

Based on limited historical information, the Glenmere Lake Property was originally part of a 1,440-acre estate owned by Richard Goelet in the 1940’s under the name “Glenmere Lake Estates, Inc.” The Glenmere Lake Property includes the estate’s former servant’s quarters, maintenance facility and stables. The on-site facilities and buildings have been abandoned for nearly 30 years. Given the age of the dilapidated buildings, it was assumed that they likely contained AMC and lead-based paint.

The objective of the project was to characterize the nature and extent of site contamination, including the presence of asbestos and lead-based paint in the dilapidated buildings, and to formulate a remedial strategy to address the identified contamination with the understanding that the County will eventually develop the property as parkland.

Investigation Scope of Work

In order to meet the project objectives, investigation activities undertaken by D&B included.

• Geophysical Survey
• Asbestos and Lead-Based Paint Survey
• Fish and Wildlife Impact Analysis
• Surface Soil and Shallow Subsurface Soil Sampling
• Soil Probe and Subsurface Soil Sampling
• Groundwater Probe Sampling
• Surface Water Sediment Sampling

Glenmere Lake contains one of the largest known populations of the Northern Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) in Orange County and possibly in the state of New York and is an endangered species in the State of New York. In order to ensure that the investigation and remediation of the Glenmere Lake property did not harm the frogs or their habitat, an intensive spring migration study was completed by D&B in April and May 2008. The study involved the construction of drift fences around the site designed to funnel any wildlife attempting to enter or exit the site to hide boxes and traps. The hide boxes were opened and inspected twice daily. All frogs and other animals were identified, counted and released on the lakeside of the drift fences. While cricket frogs were observed on the easternmost portion of the Glenmere Lake property, no cricket frogs were observed or captured in the western portion of the site or in the vicinity of the dilapidated buildings during the study.

Investigation Findings

The completed lead and asbestos investigation clearly identified AMC and lead-based paint throughout the dilapidated buildings.

Surface soil samples collected from within the area and downgradient of the dilapidated buildings were found to contain metals, in particular lead and arsenic in excess of NYSDEC Soil Cleanup Objectives. Given the shallow nature of the soil, these contaminants are potentially accessible to the public and wildlife. Therefore, the presence of the metals in shallow soil represents a potential exposure pathway.

Surface water sediment samples collected from Glenmere Lake downgradient of the dilapidated buildings also contained  elevated concentrations of several metals, including lead, arsenic, mercury and copper. While direct exposure to humans is not expected, aquatic organisms could be exposed to these contaminants under current conditions.

Interim Remedial Measure

D&B developed an Interim Remedial Measure (IRM) work plan for the removal of the three USTs and the two ASTs from the property as well as any petroleum impacted soil associated with the tanks. The tank removal IRM will be undertaken prior to the remediation of the remaining portions of the property. In September 2009, the NYSDEC approved the work plan and shortly there after, D&B developed a bid package for the work for the County’s solicitation of bids. With the assistance of D&B, the County has selected a remediation subcontractor to perform the work that is tentatively scheduled for mid-June 2010.

Selected Sitewide Remediation

Based on the completed site investigation results and with the understanding that the USTs and ASTs will be remediated as part of the IRM scheduled for mid-June, 2010, the overall site remediation will include:

• Demolition and removal of all dilapidated structures and associated equipment.
• Removal of all above grade concrete building foundations and structures, including the concrete/stone pump house.
• Removal of various miscellaneous debris from the site.
• Removal of shallow surface soil in and around the dilapidated buildings/structures containing elevated levels of lead and, to a lesser degree, arsenic.
• Backfill all below grade structures and foundations.
• Restore excavated and disturbed areas.

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